Thursday, January 02, 2014

lids...

A souvenir of Arkansas
Here are two examples of lift lids for a maple box. Both are slightly oversize in length and width to give a finger grip on all sides. Each lid gives a distinctive character to the box. Do you have a favorite?

The walnut and maple lid will have walnut lift tabs added to the ends to bring clarity as to how to pick it up. The extended tabs on the rock box, make the handling of the lid abundantly clear.

Maple and walnut lift off lid
I had a lovely day in the wood shop. It is nice on a cold day to have a fire in the wood stove. In fact few experiences can beat this.

In addition to making lids, I'm applying trim to windows that we had replaced in our office and living room. I'm making the trim from clear white pine 1 x 6's.

The start of the new year brings new opportunities and also reminds us to take care of things left waiting from the old. One good thing about woodworking is that you can step away from it for a day or so, and the project you were working on remembers just where you left off.

Make, fix and create...

10 comments:

  1. The stone lid is absolutely beautiful.
    With the curved line, it reminds me of pebbles on a sea shore.
    Brgds Jonas

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  2. By the way, did you use epoxy glue for mounting the stones?

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  3. The stones are loose so they can be removed, or spilled by accident. Each fits in a small recess cut for it using the scroll saw.

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  4. It's not easy choosing a favorite between those two. And Jonas asked the question I had. So the lid with the stones wasn't cut into two pieces on the scrollsaw?

    Mario

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  5. Yes, cutting the lid into two pieces with the scroll saw is the way to gain access to cut the spaces for the stones to fit.

    The meandering line is to convey the notion of a stream bed.

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  6. Ah, got it. So it's like the table you did a few years ago.

    Mario

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  7. Exactly! I don't have that many new ideas so I keep recycling old ones.

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  8. Doug,

    You don't need to come up with a million ideas if the ones you do come up with are good ones.

    Mario

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  9. And if you keep getting better at it. I am always amazed that what folks think are my cleverest ideas are ones that took the longest time to arrive through my hands to my brain.

    For instance, the rocks. I had done rocks in a table top, and didn't think much of it. Then an editor from FWW saw it and wanted me to write an article about it. And at the time, I thought it was too simple an idea for that. But the juxtaposition of rocks and wood seems to capture the surprise of the viewer.

    This summer in my class, we'll be talking about surprise a lot.

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  10. Doug,

    The lid with stones is easily my favourite. I like the wavy line between them, too. I might laminate the lid from two pieces and trap the stones inside so they can rattle around a little, but can't escape.

    Chris

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